Say No To Drugs

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It’s amazing and disgusting how many drug commercials there are on television these days urging you to “ask your doctor about” their latest drug and then reeling off a list of horrible possible side effects. Yes, sometimes Big Pharma is necessary. Yes, some illnesses can only be treated with some kind of medication.
Many of today’s common ailments can be treated by a simple lifestyle change. A good diet and getting off the couch can lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol, help lower the rate of heart disease and reverse diabetes.
I was on Metformin for several years to “treat” my diabetes. It wasn’t until I figured things out three years ago and started losing weight through watching what I eat and running that I actually started to see an improvement. Most times drugs are designed to treat symptoms, not the cause of any disease you may have.
You can presecribe yourself a healthier life simply by changing the way you live. Below is something I tweeted.
“Instead of asking your doctor if the latest “wonder drug” from Big Pharma is good for you, why don’t you ask your doctor if a healthy diet and active lifestyle is good for you. Side effects include well being health and happiness.”
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My Continued Fight Against Diabetes

So after a 5 mile run I came home to great news. I got my bloodwork back before my latest doctor visit tomorrow. My A1C was 5.2. December 2014 my A1C was 7.2 and my doctor wanted to put me on a second medication, one that’s strongly linked with causing liver problems.

No, thank you!

I had already been taking Metformin since August 2008. Well, that was the kick up the butt I needed. I joined @MyFitnesspal and started running and by April 21st (my birthday) I was able to stop taking Metformin altogether. I have been drug free since then. I lost a total of 35 lbs since I started that health journey. I have had no problem maintaining my weight loss.

In June 2015 my A1C was 5.8. Last August it was 5.3 and now it’s down to 5.2.  For those that don’t know, the A1C is a blood test that gives a three month snapshot of how your body’s blood glucose level is.  There seem to be some slight disagreement on the exact numbers but generally if your A1C is 6.5 or higher you are considered diabetic.

To anyone who is type 2 diabetic: You CAN beat it. You CAN get off medication. You CAN live a healthy life. But it isn’t easy. It requires a serious lifestyle change. It requires hard work. It requires dedication. The only question is…are you willing to do what it takes to turn your health around? I did. I’m living proof that you can do anything you set your mind to.IMG_20170627_145423_787